“The Laughter of Strangers” reviewed by The Believer

The Laughter of Strangers has been given a little bit of a nod with a mesmerizing, critical review by Andrea Longini for The Believer. Here’s a glimpse of what she discussed:

At times it seems that our online personas are destined to become nothing more than a graveyard, a landfill for multiple competing identities in an endless game that simply cannot be won. In that sense, the right question is not even how to win the game of personal branding, it is in the larger philosophical question of how we can assume heaviness and lightness in our own identities. Enough of using shallow techniques to generate audience reaction, The Laughter of Strangers seems to suggest. Let us instead consider what framework we adopt to determine what has repercussions in life, and what doesn’t.

Believer

Click here for the full review.

“The Fun We’ve Had” reviewed by PANK

Joseph Michael Owens had some really great things to say about both The Fun We’ve Had and my obsession with the literary craft:

It’s nearly impossible to imagine Michael Seidlinger’s pen ever stopping. He’s already published more books than the majority of writers are likely to in their whole careers. The key feature of nearly everything Seidlinger writes is that it’s almost certainly guaranteed to be different than the last book he wrote. The only constant in Seidlinger’s writing—besides the shining quality of the prose—is change. Indeed, the only given is that he doesn’t show any signs of stopping.

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Click here to read the rest of the review

The Fun We’ve Had reviewed by Full Stop

The Fun We’ve Had received a glowing review from Gabino Iglesias over at Full Stop. Here’s a snippet from the review:

The Fun We’ve Had is a smart novel that inhabits the interstitial spaces between reality and fantasy, life and death, love and hate. It also dares to explore that strange nonspace that lies between death and oblivion. This book, to be fully enjoyed, demands a curious reciprocity between reader and text because the reader becomes the couple and the prose morphs into a direct conversation, punctuated time and again by a question that interrogates on more than one level: “Are we having fun?” And the answer to that is a resounding “Yes.”

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Click here for the full review.

 

“The Fun We’ve Had” reviewed by the Fanzine

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The Fanzine published an amazing review of The Fun We’ve Had. Big shout out to James Yates for writing the review, Sarah Rose Etter for editing, Casey McKinney for making the review possible, and Blake Butler being all around awesome. Here’s a snippet from the review:

Seidlinger does craft a genuinely moving story about a relationship. There’s affection on both sides, even if the problems appear insurmountable. Throughout the experimental forms, there’s a genuine affectation the reader feels for these characters. And while the question isn’t meant to be an explicit one like “Will they survive?” or “Will they overcome their differences?,” little passages take on sweet, even old-fashioned sentiments in beautiful ways.

He wouldn’t be able to know without letting go, without letting the coffin float in that direction, the direction where only he can go, the direction where they part ways.

Click here for the full review.

 

“The Fun We’ve Had” reviewed by Gabriel Ricard for Drunk Monkeys

Among one of the first reviews of the book, Gabriel Ricard nailed it with his review of “The Fun We’ve Had” over at Drunk Monkeys. Here’s a glimpse:

Don’t take anything for granted, and don’t expect what you believe about death to fill in the blanks. The only thing you can be sure of is the proven range of Seidlinger’s imagination restating itself here, and of his ability to take something like slipping the murky depths of eternity (the book is appropriately broken down into the stages of grief), and turn it into an apocalyptic, poetic, and existential fairytale.

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Click here for the full review.

The Laughter of Strangers reviewed by Bookslut

Gabino Iglesias reviewed The Laughter of Strangers for one of the longest-running online magazines, the well-known and well-regarded Bookslut. It’s taken me quite a long time to post this on the blog because any and all attempts to “quote” a selection from the review has resulted in quoting the entire review. Damn, this is fucking difficult. Okay, random snippet from the review is as follows:

BOOKSLUT

An unexpected element of The Laughter of Strangers that merits being mentioned is the way Seidlinger uses the page. Instead of filling the page, the narrative here seems deliberately placed. As a result, blank space takes on a multiplicity of meanings and single sentences seem to be under a spotlight.

The Laughter of Strangers is a brave attempt at decoding identity by looking at it through a media microscope that’s stained with insanity. Seidlinger has made a name for himself by writing odd narratives with a smart edge, and this fast-paced and paranoid tale of a shattered psyche in a decaying body is his best outing yet.

Click here to read the full review.

 

The Laughter of Strangers reviewed by Alt Lit Gossip

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Two heavy metal horns up for this one. Chris Dankland, prolific blogger, literary critic and all around awesome guy has begun reviewing books for Alt Lit Gossip and chose “The Laughter of Strangers” to be the first! Here’s a sample from his review:

this book made me think a lot about the internet game and how that applies to becoming a successful writer/artist — people tend to exaggerate certain things about themselves to create an interesting online persona, so they can build an audience and reach readers

the novel’s title ‘The Laughter of Strangers’ showcases the kind of high anxiety and psychological nightmare you can easily fall into if your core identity/self of worth is largely derived from how an audience perceives you

Click here for the full review.