“The Strangest” included in Volume 1 Brooklyn’s October 2015 Books Preview

The Strangest was included among other amazing October new releases like Lincoln Michel’s Upright Beasts in Volume 1 Brooklyn’s October 2015 Books Preview. As always, Tobias Carroll and Jason Diamond are on the pulse of indie and contemporary lit.

This is, apparently, the year for literary riffs on Camus’s The Stranger. Earlier in the year, Kamel Daoud’s The Mersault Investigation examined its themes from an Algerian perspective; now, Michael J. Seidlinger’s The Strangest updates its tale of alienation to the present day.

Click here for the full article.

“The Laughter of Strangers” reviewed by Benoit Lelievre for Dead End Follies

Benoit Lelievre with an astonishingly honest review of The Laughter of Strangers.

THE LAUGHTER OF STRANGERS, by Michael J. Seidlinger takes an honest swing at the boxing novel, yet it’s a boxing novel that’s not about boxing. That’s why I think it is quite successful at what it’s trying to do.

Click here for the full review.

Unnamed Press to publish FALTER KINGDOM in Fall 2016

I wrote a YA book about friendship and demonic possession called FALTER KINGDOM and it’ll be out in 2016. S/o to Olivia Taylor Smith and Unnamed Press for spearheading the book’s publication and being the kind of enthusiastic supporter a jaded author like myself (I am my own worst enemy) can often be about his children (every book I write).

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Heather Fowler interviewed me for Fictionaut

Heather Fowler interviewed me for Fictionaut’s Writers on Craft series. Here’s a snippet from the interview:

Oddly, I find solace in the grim details of a text, the ones that bare all and show the reader that there are no clean breaks, no certainties without dealing with the issue head-on. It’s when I see that what I am feeling isn’t any different than what so many others have felt that I begin to breathe normally again, perhaps even long enough to step outside and remember what it feels like to take a long walk with no clear destination in mind.

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Click here for the full interview.

Benjamin Rybeck profiled me for Brazos Bookstore

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Benjamin Rybeck of Brazos Bookstore profiled me for the bookstore’s official website. Here’s a snippet from the article:

This is how Seidlinger and other writers in the Internet want to be perceived: as dedicated enough to the craft to work through Easter, but also dedicated to reminding people they’re dedicated to that craft. Of course, this post comes with twelve likes (so far)—which is enough to demonstrate the shrewdness of Seidlinger’s persona (but not so many likes as come with the average post by Matt Bell, the undisputed master of the hardworking literary persona).

Seidlinger has his own brand recognition though: the liberal use of the metal horns—or, \m/. (He once ran a Facebook contest where he gave away free books to the first people whose comments on his posts received a certain number of \m/s from Seidlinger himself.) “It does have a bit of a branding quality,” Seidlinger says, “but like any brand, if you use something to the point that it’s always there, it loses its appeal.”

Click here for the full article.

“The Fun We’ve Had” reviewed by American Book Review

Now here’s a fun one, The Fun We’ve Had was reviewed by Lavinia Ludlow for the American Book Review. Here’s a snippet from the review:

The Fun We’ve Had is a philosophic commentary of a couple’s rise and fall, including all the fights, challenges, and conversations that happen in between. Michael Seidlinger took the ubiquitous dysfunctional relationship, its miserable realities and foreseeable demise, and presented it all in an unusual fashion: through the metaphor of being lost at sea in a coffin. His dream-like narration reads like a novel-length poem and tells a morbid tale of a couple’s heartbreaking downfall as they learn and unlearn how to love.

Click here for the full review.